NXP unveils next gen processors for autonomous and electric vehicles

By Jonathan Dyble
NXP Semiconductors, considered to be the world’s largest supplier of automotive semiconductors, has unveiled its latest range of high performance micr...

NXP Semiconductors, considered to be the world’s largest supplier of automotive semiconductors, has unveiled its latest range of high performance microprocessors for next generation electric and autonomous vehicles.

Named the NXP S32, these new microprocessors will manage the systems that control acceleration, braking and steering, both with human and autonomous vehicle control in mind.

See also:

Vehicles technology is transforming from responding to a driver’s demand into becoming fully autonomous systems that are able to both give commands and execute them – systems that will require more powerful hardware.

“We see that the shift to next-generation autonomous and electric vehicles is introducing huge challenges to carmakers,” said Ian Riches, Executive Director in the Strategy Analytics Global Automotive Practice.

“Not least of these is the ability to get silicon in hand fast enough and with enough performance headroom to ease the transitions to autonomous and advanced EV. A car can be extremely intelligent, but if it can’t act safely on a decision, you don’t have a reliable autonomous system at all.”

The NXP S32 platform will look to overcome these challenges as the world’s first fully scalable automotive computing architecture.

Share

Featured Articles

Now is the ideal time to drive deep tech disruption

Deep tech may seem like it's years away but now is the time for organisations to be building a deep tech strategy, according to insights by BCG

UK has a technology trust problem among older bank customers

The global financial services industry has undergone enormous change, but trust in technology remains an issue for many in the UK, according to research

McLaren Racing & Alteryx Analytics: Data-driven to win

McLaren CEO Zak Brown, Head of Technology Ed Brown, and CDAO at Alteryx, Alan Jacobson, detail the widespread organisational benefits of good data

Bitcoin’s climate footprint is a step in the wrong direction

Data & Data Analytics

ICYMI: The potential of 5G and Europe’s technology gap

Enterprise IT

Oracle NetSuite’s SuiteWorld 2022 - Day 3 Highlights

Data & Data Analytics