Samsung Research to open three new AI centres

By Jonathan Dyble
Samsung’s global research and development (R&D) subsidiary, Samsung Research, has announced that it will be opening three new state of the art art...

Samsung’s global research and development (R&D) subsidiary, Samsung Research, has announced that it will be opening three new state of the art artificial intelligence centres across the globe, raising the current total to five.

The new centres in Cambridge, UK; Moscow, Russia; and Toronto, Canada will join the company existing Seoul and Silicon Valley AI centres that were launched last year.

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The facilities will be used to further bolster the company’s R&D footprint on a global scale, with the firm set to work closely with esteemed institutions and educational leaders in the way of developing state of the art AI-powered technologies.

“Samsung has a long history of pursuing innovation and we are excited to be bringing that same passion and technology leadership to AI,” said Hyun-suk Kim, President and Head of Samsung Research at the opening ceremony of the new AI Center in Cambridge.

“With the new AI Centers and recruitment of leading experts in the field, our aim is to be a game changer for the AI industry.”

The company focuses on five key principles in its vision for AI: User centric, always learning, always there, always helpful and always safe.

“To provide a user-centric ecosystem, Samsung aims to build an AI platform under a common architecture that will not only scale quickly but also provide the deepest understanding of usage context and behaviors, making AI more relevant and useful,” Samsung said.

As part of the initiative, the company has also announced that it hopes to expand its advanced AI research workforce to over 1,000 by 2020.

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