May 17, 2020

Capgemini: Why do we need ethical AI?

AI
Inclusion & Diversity
Harry Menear
3 min
Capgemini just released a brand new report exploring the opinions of dozens of industry experts on the ethics of using artificial intelligence
Global consulting and research firm Capgemini just released a brand new report exploring the opinions of dozens of industry experts on the ethics of usi...

Global consulting and research firm Capgemini just released a brand new report exploring the opinions of dozens of industry experts on the ethics of using artificial intelligence (AI). The report, Conversations, collects the responses of experts from Harvard, Oxford University, Bayer, AXA and more, who offer critical insights on a range of ethical questions that the proliferation of AI has unleashed. 

“AI is set to radically change the way organisations manage their businesses, and is a revolutionary technology that will change the world we live in,” commented Jerome Buvat, Global Head of the Capgemini Research Institute. “The interviews with leaders and practitioners for this new report emphasised its far-reaching implications, and how there is a need to infuse ethics into the design of AI algorithms. They also placed immense importance on the need to make AI transparent, and understandable, in order to build greater trust.”

We’ve drawn together some of the report’s key findings and included commentary from some of the leading experts to be consulted. 

Why do we need ethical AI?

 “In a system where a machine makes a decision, we want to make sure that the decision of that system is done in a way that ensures people’s confidence in that decision.” - Daniela Rus, MIT CSAIL

“We need to ensure that AI is acting in such a way that we can hold it accountable and also respond if we determine it is acting in a way that we don’t believe to be consistent with our values and/or laws.” - Ryan Budish, Harvard University

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“Trust in new technologies can only be gained by providing an ethical framework for their implementation. Our goal in healthcare is not to let AI take decisions, but to help doctors make better decisions. AI has its strengths – analyzing huge amounts of data and generating insights that a human being wouldn’t have thought of before. It is able to identify certain patterns, such as radiological images, and supports the diagnosis of a doctor. AI is meant to enhance or augment the capabilities of humans.” - Saskia Steinacker, Bayer

 “Algorithmic systems are amoral… they do not have a moral compass. Yet, they can make decisions that have pervasive moral consequences.” - Nicolas Economou, H5

The ethics of AI needs to be a shared responsibility.

“In the case of ethics, this is not something where responsibility lies with any particular individual in the company,” says Michael Natusch, global head of AI at Prudential Plc. “It is a shared responsibility for all of us.” 

Budish agrees that even when specific roles are created, responsibility is still shared in areas such as privacy. “Everyone in an organisation has an obligation to respect the privacy of customers or to protect their data,” he says. “Certainly, organisations have created positions like chief privacy officer to help ensure that the right policies and systems are in place. But the responsibility itself lies with everyone.” 

The role of humans in ensuring that, even though AI can make decisions, its lack of an inherent or learned moral conception doesn’t result in unforeseen, even dangerous consequences. 

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Jun 15, 2021

Searching for the Top 100 Leaders in Technology

Technology
AI
live
leaders
2 min
Have your say and nominate technology industry influencers and legends in our search for the Top 100 Leaders announced at upcoming LIVE event

The search is on for the Top 100 Leaders in Technology 2021 – nominated by readers of Technology magazine and open to all.

The initiative has been launched and nominations are now open, with the final, prestigious Top 100 due to be announced during Technology and AI LIVE running 14-16 September, beamed from London to the world.

This latest, definitive list of the leading executives and influencers in the industry will be announced at the event and shared across social media channels, this website, and presented in a special supplement that honours all of those named in our annual list.

The Top 100 Leaders follows on from the well-received Top 100 Women in Technology that BizClik Media Group (BMG) – publishers of Technology magazine, AI magazine and a growing portfolio of industry-leading titles – produced in March this year to coincide with International Women’s Day. 

“The Top 100 Women recognised the incredible and influential women driving our industry,” says Scott Birch, editorial director, BMG. “The success of that initiative encouraged us to recognise the Top 100 Leaders – individuals championing everything that we love about technology and embracing best practice that’s good for business.”

Nominations are already coming in, with some notable highlights including:

Rhonda Vetere - Herbalife

Bryan Smith - Expedient

Nominate your Top 100 Leader HERE

The deadline for nominations closes on Sunday 1 August 2021, and it is free to nominate. The Top 100 Leaders will be announced across our platforms and at the LIVE event.

 

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