May 17, 2020

CES 2020 roundup: Samsung, LG, demo display technology

AI
Entertainment
William Smith
2 min
While the consumer electronics show (CES) 2020 doesn’t officially start until the 7th, that hasn’t stopped companies from laying out their stalls
While the consumer electronics show (CES) 2020 doesn’t officially start until the 7th, that hasn’t stopped companies from laying out their stalls...

While the consumer electronics show (CES) 2020 doesn’t officially start until the 7th, that hasn’t stopped companies from laying out their stalls.

A hotbed for upcoming technology, last year’s outing of the Las Vegas-based tradeshow saw the likes of driverless cars and smart home technology, setting the agenda for a year of autonomous car advances and IoT privacy discussions.

At this early stage, some of the event’s biggest announcements have been in the consumer display space. While 4K screens feel as if they’ve only just arrived, already 8K displays are being shown off. South Korean electronics firms LG and Samsung have both announced new televisions ahead of the event.

In LG’s case, the firm emphasised the AI technology working behind the scenes to process images for improved quality. “LG’s vision to offer outstanding value to its customers comes to life this year with the company’s new line-up of art-inspired TVs,” said Park Hyoung-sei, president of the LG Home Entertainment Company. “Beyond the unrivaled picture quality that LG’s premium TVs deliver, the new additions also come with the company’s advanced technologies, best in AI-integration and unrivalled, futuristic design made possible by OLED technology.”

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It’s not all been screens, however. One of the more unorthodox announcements came from German industrial company Bosch. The company has debuted a virtual visor to combat the issue of sun glare. Instead of a traditional, opaque visor, Bosch’s solution features a transparent LCD and a camera which, with the help of AI, detects the presence of sunlight on the eyes and proactively darken a segment of the screen to occlude the sun’s rays.

“For most drivers around the world, the visor component as we know it is not enough to avoid hazardous sun glare – especially at dawn and dusk when the sun can greatly decrease drivers’ vision,” said Dr. Steffen Berns, president of Bosch Car Multimedia. “Some of the simplest innovations make the greatest impact, and Virtual Visor changes the way drivers see the road.”

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Jun 23, 2021

Timeline: Nvidia

Nvidia
graphics
AI
enterprise
2 min
As Nvidia ramps up to activate its AI solutions, we take a look at the company’s history

1993 – Founding

Jensen Huang from AMD, and Chris Malachowsky and Curtis Priem from Sun Microsystems, saw a market to improve graphics performance with dedicated hardware. They sensed that computer games would become a huge market and set out with $40,000 to found Nvidia.

1993 – Funding

Having named the company after a file-naming system they had devised, the trio needed funding, which came in the shape of a $20 million venture capital round led by Sequoia Capital. 

1998 – Breakthrough

Nvidia had some success but their breakthrough would come with the introduction of the RIVA TNT graphics adapter. The following year, the company released the GeForce 256, which had on-board transformation and lighting. The GeForce comfortably led competitors.

2000s – success

Nvidia won the contract to develop graphics hardware for Microsoft’s Xbox and would go on to provide similar services to Sony for the Playstation 3. A slew of acquisitions and awards made Nvidia a household name in graphics.

2020 – Cambridge-1

The benefits of using the awesome power of graphics hardware to process other data was not lost on Nvidia, which announced plans to build the Cambridge-1, the UK’s most powerful computer. The company’s future in AI hardware development is virtually secure.

Photo credit: Nvidia

 

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