May 17, 2020

Gartner tech trends 2020: Developing the multiexperience

Harry Menear
2 min
Following up from the release of Gartner’s top 10 strategic technology trends for 2020, Gigabit Magazine is doing a series breaking down the biggest technology trends set to reshape the global business landscape next year. 
Following up from the release of Gartner’s top 10 strategic technology trends for 2020, Gigabit Magazine is doing a series breaking down the biggest t...

Following up from the release of Gartner’s top 10 strategic technology trends for 2020, Gigabit Magazine is doing a series breaking down the biggest technology trends set to reshape the global business landscape next year. 

2020, Gartner reports, will be defined by the idea of “people-centric smart spaces,” which are expected to have “a profound impact on the people and the spaces they inhabit,” said Brian Burke, Gartner Research VP, at Gartner 2019 IT Symposium/Xpo™ in Orlando, Florida. “Rather than building a technology stack and then exploring the potential applications, organisations must consider the business and human context first.” 

Gartner’s experts concur: 2020 is the year when the technology-literate people are going to be replaced by people-literate technology. The phenomenon, called “multiexperience,” is seeing the traditional idea of a computer evolves from a single point of interaction to include multisensory and multitouchpoint interfaces like wearables and advanced computer sensors. 

Virtual and augmented reality, smart speakers, autonomous vehicles, all blending together into an omni-channel user interface driven by creative marketing and experience creation. Everything from Dominos delivering pizza using self-driving cars to Wendy’s (sort of backlash against tech driven multi-experience marketing in the form of a) tabletop roleplaying game is combining into a multi-technology experience for the user. 

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In its Magic Quadrant report for multiexperience development platforms, which was released in June, Gartner wrote that “by 2023, more than 25% of the mobile apps, progressive web apps and conversational apps at large enterprises will be built and/or run through a multiexperience development platform.”

The report also named Outsystems, Mendix and Kony as the leading developers of multiexperience platforms, in terms of the completeness of their vision and ability to execute on them. 

In the future, Gartner predicts this trend will become what’s called an ambient experience, but currently multiexperience focuses on immersive experiences that use AR, VR, mixed reality, multichannel human-machine interfaces and sensing technologies. The combination of these technologies can be used for a simple AR overlay or a fully immersive VR experience. 

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Jun 15, 2021

IT Employees Predict 90% Increase in Cloud Security Spending

Technology
Cloud
Cybersecurity
Investments
Elise Leise
3 min
Companies that took the initiative on cloud platforms are trying to cope with the security risks, according to Devo Technology’s report

As companies get back on their feet post-pandemic, they’re going all-in on cloud applications. In a recent report by Devo Technology titled “Beyond Cloud Adoption: How to Embrace the Cloud for Security and Business Benefits”, 81% of the 500 IT and security team members surveyed said that COVID accelerated their cloud timelines. More than half of the top-performing businesses reported gains in visibility. In fact, the cloud now outnumbers on-premise solutions at a 3:1 ratio

But the benefits are accompanied by significant cybersecurity risks, as cloud infrastructure is more complex than legacy systems. Let’s dive in. 

 

Why Are Cloud Platforms Taking Over? 

According to Forrester, the public cloud infrastructure market could grow 28% over the next year, up to US$113.1bn. Companies shifting to remote work and decentralised workplaces find it easy to store and access information, especially as networks start to share more and more supply chain and enterprise information—think risk mitigation platforms and ESG ratings. 

Here’s the catch: when you shift to the cloud, you choose a more complex system, which often requires cloud-native platforms for network security. In other words, you can’t stop halfway. ‘Only cloud-native platforms can keep up with [the cloud’s] speed and complexity” and ultimately increase visibility and control’, said Douglas Murray, CEO at cloud security provider Valtix. 

Here’s a quick list of the top cloud security companies, as ranked by Software Testing Help: 

 

What are the Security Issues? 

Here’s the bad news. According to Accenture, less than 40% of companies have achieved the full value they expected on their cloud investments. All-in greater complexity has forced companies to spend more to hire skilled tech workers, analyse security data, and manage new cybersecurity threats. 

The two main issues are (1) a lack of familiarity with cloud systems and (2) challenges with shifting legacy security systems to new platforms. Out of the 500 IT employees from Devo Technology’s cloud report, for example, 80% said they’d sorted 40% more security data, suffered from a lack of cloud security training, and experienced a 60% increase in cybersecurity threats. 

How Will Companies React? 

They certainly won’t stop investing in cloud platforms. Out of the 500 enterprise-level companies that Devo Technology talked to throughout North America and Western Europe, 90% anticipated a jump in cloud security spending in 2021. They’ll throw money at automating security processes and investing in security upskilling programmes. 

After all, company executives will find it incredibly difficult to stick with legacy systems when some cloud-centred companies have found success. Since moving from Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) offerings to the cloud, Accenture has saved up to 70% on its processes; recently, the company announced that it would invest US$3bn to help its clients ‘realise the cloud’s business value, speed, cost, talent, and innovation benefits’. 


The company stated: ‘Security is often seen as the biggest inhibitor to a cloud-first journey—but in reality, it can be its greatest accelerator’. 

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