Jun 17, 2020

OneSpan webinar: digitising the commercial lending process

Matt High
1 min
Digital Lending
A new webinar from OneSpan discusses how to digitise the commercial lending process in times of crisis...

The global COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented change to individuals, businesses and economies worldwide.

As a result, many businesses and institutions have faced unparalleled financial impact that has seen governments around the world issuing economic stimulus and relief packages.

Due to the severity of the impact of coronavirus, a large number of businesses affected need these funds as quickly as possible.

This means that a smooth lending process is paramount.

Achieving that is the subject of a new webinar from digital identity and anti-fraud leader, OneSpan that will be held on 18 June at 3pm AEST.

In Digitising the Commercial Lending Process, OneSpan discusses the impact on businesses of the current crisis in more detail.

It expands on the importance of a smooth, digitally-driven lending process that enables businesses to get the funds they need to ensure survival.

OneSpan explains that, from the EU, where the European Investment Fund will guarantee loans to at least 100,000 European SMEs and small mid-cap companies, to Japan, where SMBs and large organisations are being offered various stimulus packages, global lending continues at pace.

In the 18 June webinar, which is held in association with Loan Market, expert speakers will expand on the importance of quickly digitising the commercial lending process in times of crisis.

This will ensure that customers are being helped in their moment of need through the use of electronic signature and ID document verification.

Join the webinar to find out more on:

  • How e-signature can help meet the urgent need for small business loans
  • How ID document verification can help prevent fraud in the digital channel
  • Security and authentication tips
  • Loan Market use case

The webinar will be held by OneSpan’s Global eSignature Product Manager, Michael Lakhal, and Joanne Church, Chief Operations Officer for Loan Market’s MyCRM technology.

Lakhal has more than 10 years’ experience in the digital signature market, focused on B2C for financial services. He has previously served as an e-commerce manager at French banks Cofidis and Banque Accord, and has experience of building the first mass market platform for B2C transactions and driving related product activity across the EMEA region.

Church is an expert at understanding complex problems and distilling them into understandable components so they can be solved. At Loan Market she leads the team that provides support to the users of the company’s MyCRM in Australia.

About OneSpan

OneSpan specialises in digital identity and anti-fraud solutions that create exceptional and secure experiences.

The company’s solutions have helped prevent billions of dollars worth of fraudulent activity and cover everything from risk-based adaptive authentication to digital identity verification.

Register to OneSpan’s Digitising the Commercial Lending Process here .

Find out more about OneSpan here.

Find out more about Loan Market here.
 

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Jun 24, 2021

Legend: John McAfee

McAfee
Cybersecurity
Intel
2 min
A controversial figure, John McAfee is credited with starting an entire technology industry around cybersecurity

John McAfee is credited with starting the entire cybersecurity industry. In 1987, he set up McAfee Associates and released VirusScan. Previous antivirus programs had been released, but McAfee’s was the first with mass appeal and was soon a day zero (or at least day one) installation for Windows users as well as corporate clients.

McAfee: divisive

But McAfee was also a hugely divisive character. He dismissed his own software, claimed he never used it, and rejoiced when Intel bought McAfee and took his name off “the worst software on the planet.” He was anti-tax, pro-drugs, anti-war and pro-free trade. He was also a tireless crusader for cyber awareness, and set up a political party called the Cyber Party in order to make a bid for the office of president of the US.

“I am now everlastingly grateful to Intel for freeing me from this terrible association with the worst software on the planet”

McAfee: born in the UK

McAfee was born in Gloucestershire, UK, but moved to Salem, Virginia, where his American father (his mother was English) shot himself when McAfee was 15. McAfee worked at NASA, Univac, Xerox, Computer Sciences Corporation, Booz Allen Hamilton and Lockheed. It was while working at the latter he was given a copy of Brain, the first computer virus for PC, and began to engineer a defence.

McAfee: controversy

Controversy dogged McAfee. He was implicated as a ‘person of interest’ in the search for a neighbour who had been shot. He married a prostitute. He claimed a cocaine baron was writing his biography. He was arrested for possession of an unlicensed weapon and for manufacturing drugs in Belize (later released without charge). There were various other arrests (mainly weapons related) but not much would stick until McAfee’s anti-tax stance caught up with him. 

McAfee: arrest

He fled the US as tax authorities turned up the heat on at least four years of non payment of tax and was arrested (again) in Spain in October 2020 at the behest of the US Department of Justice. Charges for fraudulently promoting cryptocurrencies were soon added and he was formally indicted in March 2021. In June 2021, the Spanish National Court authorised McAfee’s extradition to the US, and McAfee was found dead in his cell just hours later in what is widely believed to be a suicide.

McAfee: death

Even in death, McAfee courted controversy, having announced that if he was ever found to have committed suicide, it would mean he had been murdered. A slew of conspiracy theories mushroomed in the hours after his death was announced. It’s just what he would have wanted.

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