Nov 12, 2020

Oracle’s leadership in cloud database solutions

Oracle
Cloud
database
William Smith
2 min
Multinational software company Oracle offers a suite of enterprise technology, but is perhaps best known for its database solutions
Multinational software company Oracle offers a suite of enterprise technology, but is perhaps best known for its database solutions...

Multinational software company Oracle offers a suite of enterprise technology, but is perhaps best known for its database solutions. 

Founded in 1977 and based in California, among Oracle’s offerings are analytics software featuring machine learning integration for automation and prediction. Also including visualisation and collaboration capabilities, the software is integrated with the company’s wider Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.

The company recently won plaudits as a leader in Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Cloud Human Capital Management Suites, for the fifth consecutive year. Evaluated based on “completeness of vision and ability to execute”, Oracle came out top on the former criterion for the past three years.

In a press release, Chris Leone, senior vice president of development, Oracle Cloud HCM, said: “We believe our position as a Leader placed furthest for completeness of vision—for the third year in a row—recognizes Oracle Cloud HCM’s commitment to both our customers and continued innovation for HR leaders around the world. This year in particular has been incredibly tough on businesses across every industry. Oracle is proud to be a leader in helping HR navigate the new workplace and define what’s next for their organizations.”

The company also came out on top of a recent report ranking the top enterprise cloud databases, beating out the likes of Amazon and Microsoft. Lead author Alexei Balaganski said: “Oracle has been continuously developing numerous innovative database capabilities for decades.” One of the factors allowing it to come out on top were intelligent automation features which remove the need for human interaction.

You can read more about Oracle’s work with JTI in our latest issue, as Chief Information Officer Atiq Samad reveals the transformations he has overseen, saying “as part of our trade marketing excellence (TME) program, we decided to go to the latest technologies with Oracle, which is the Oracle Engagement Cloud.”

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Jul 24, 2021

213% increase in cyber attacks on UK remote council workers

Technology
insight
cyberattacks
UK
2 min
Insight FOI requests show 98% of councils plan to expand use of remote working post-pandemic, but only 20% made additional security investments

Cyber attacks on UK councils’ remote workers more than tripled during the pandemic, according to a series of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests. The requests made by Insight, a Fortune 500-ranked global provider of Intelligent Technology Solutions, found attacks rose by an average of 213% from March 2020 compared to the 12 months before. 

On average councils switched 74% of their employees, more than double the UK average, and representing more than 1.4 million workers across the UK, to remote working during the pandemic. This presented many challenges such as having to adapt to a new way of working and being under budget pressures. 

According to the FOI requests, only 20% made additional investments in security, investing an average of £46,000 – in all cases taken from the wider IT budget. As a result, investments in security came at the expense of other IT services. With increased remote working set to continue in 98% of councils, attacks targeting employees at home will likely continue to increase, especially if investing in security doesn’t become a priority.

 

Eliminating gaps in security is key 


 

“The fact that councils could move their employees to remote working without disrupting services needs to be recognised for the major achievement it was,” said Darren Hedley, Managing Director, UK & Ireland at Insight. “However, councils now need to build on this success: putting in place and strengthening defences to protect remote workers and eliminate gaps in security that could allow attackers to threaten essential services. It’s likely that many councils cannot do this alone. They need support and resources from central Government, or else we will see more and more employees and councils falling victim to attackers.”

It was found that less than half (47%) of councils invested more of their security budget in increased security training for remote workers. At the same time, only 6% prevented any employees from working remotely because it wasn’t possible to guarantee secure access to data. 

“Clearly the priority in 2020 was enabling remote working, but more than a year into the pandemic it’s worrying that many councils still haven’t been able to assess their security posture,” said Charlotte Davis, Cyber Security Practice Lead, Insight. “These assessments need cover the entire threat landscape, including third party risks, and honestly analyse gaps in the organisation’s security posture. Once this is in place, councils can take the appropriate action to repair any gaps, from investing in technology, to building security awareness and putting frameworks in place so employees can follow best practice. Doing this will demand time and resources, so it’s essential that councils are given the support they need.”

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