May 17, 2020

Rackspace to provide partner managed cloud for SAP Software

Cloud
Callum Rivett
1 min
Rackspace has announced a partnership with SAP to provide a managed cloud system for SAP's software solutions.

Offering a ready-to-use subscription-bas...

Rackspace has announced a partnership with SAP to provide a managed cloud system for SAP's software solutions.

Offering a ready-to-use subscription-based SAP solution in its private hosted cloud, which will then able customers to quickly access any SAP software without the need for upfront infrastructure.

After the recent purchase of TriCore Solutions, Rackspace can now bundle SAP software and Rackspace services together and all within its data centres.

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Mark Clayman, SVP and general manager of Rackspace Application Services, called the partnership a "one-stop-shop."

"By delivering a partner managed cloud, we’re allowing customers to quickly adopt the latest transformative SAP technologies without the high cost often associated with innovation."

"With this relationship, we’re providing a one-stop-shop for hosted services for SAP solutions to directly address the customer pain points associated with today’s complex and distributed business environment."

The partnership will also mean that Rackspace will be able to provide the software without dedicated staffing requirements and software licensing costs, effectively cutting the cost of the service.

 

 

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Jul 24, 2021

213% increase in cyber attacks on UK remote council workers

Technology
insight
cyberattacks
UK
2 min
Insight FOI requests show 98% of councils plan to expand use of remote working post-pandemic, but only 20% made additional security investments

Cyber attacks on UK councils’ remote workers more than tripled during the pandemic, according to a series of Freedom of Information (FOI) requests. The requests made by Insight, a Fortune 500-ranked global provider of Intelligent Technology Solutions, found attacks rose by an average of 213% from March 2020 compared to the 12 months before. 

On average councils switched 74% of their employees, more than double the UK average, and representing more than 1.4 million workers across the UK, to remote working during the pandemic. This presented many challenges such as having to adapt to a new way of working and being under budget pressures. 

According to the FOI requests, only 20% made additional investments in security, investing an average of £46,000 – in all cases taken from the wider IT budget. As a result, investments in security came at the expense of other IT services. With increased remote working set to continue in 98% of councils, attacks targeting employees at home will likely continue to increase, especially if investing in security doesn’t become a priority.

 

Eliminating gaps in security is key 


 

“The fact that councils could move their employees to remote working without disrupting services needs to be recognised for the major achievement it was,” said Darren Hedley, Managing Director, UK & Ireland at Insight. “However, councils now need to build on this success: putting in place and strengthening defences to protect remote workers and eliminate gaps in security that could allow attackers to threaten essential services. It’s likely that many councils cannot do this alone. They need support and resources from central Government, or else we will see more and more employees and councils falling victim to attackers.”

It was found that less than half (47%) of councils invested more of their security budget in increased security training for remote workers. At the same time, only 6% prevented any employees from working remotely because it wasn’t possible to guarantee secure access to data. 

“Clearly the priority in 2020 was enabling remote working, but more than a year into the pandemic it’s worrying that many councils still haven’t been able to assess their security posture,” said Charlotte Davis, Cyber Security Practice Lead, Insight. “These assessments need cover the entire threat landscape, including third party risks, and honestly analyse gaps in the organisation’s security posture. Once this is in place, councils can take the appropriate action to repair any gaps, from investing in technology, to building security awareness and putting frameworks in place so employees can follow best practice. Doing this will demand time and resources, so it’s essential that councils are given the support they need.”

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