May 17, 2020

The three keys to a successful, data-driven 2020

Krishna Subramanian, COO at Ko...
3 min
For 2020, there are three main areas that are predicted to experience the most change when it comes to data
It won’t come as a surprise to anyone that data growth is on the up, but what may be less widely known is that the places where data is being generate...

It won’t come as a surprise to anyone that data growth is on the up, but what may be less widely known is that the places where data is being generated are starting to change rapidly. Businesses will start to see how more of their data is being produced in the cloud or the edge, rather than in traditional data centres. The main impact of this will be on how these businesses analyse and understand their data in these locations, and then how they manage it there, without the need to use a data centre as a go-between. 

For 2020, there are three main areas that are predicted to experience the most change when it comes to data:

Data at the edge needs data management at the edge

Edge buildout is already happening, and its pace is accelerating with trends like IoT, self-driving cars, and biometrics. IDC predicts that, by 2023, 50% of all enterprise IT infrastructure will be deployed at the edge, up from 10% today. More apps are generating much more data at the edge, raising the question of why data should not be better understood and managed directly at the edge. Imagine if you could analyse data, figure out what data is useful and needs to be brought back to the data centre, and directly process the rest of the data at the edge itself without having to first move it all.  This is why edge data management will rise in importance over the next few years.

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Cross-cloud data management as a requirement

Most enterprises using the public cloud already have a hybrid or multi-cloud strategy, and enterprises are increasingly choosing to diversify their cloud strategy across two or more clouds, giving customers more freedom and choice. As this trend continues, enterprises need a simple way to understand and manage their data sprawl across clouds and the hybrid enterprise, leading to greater demand for cross-cloud data management solutions that are not tied to any particular cloud or storage vendor.

Analytics-driven AI takes centre stage

For the last couple of years, Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML) have been a big theme and this trend is continuing to grow. While these have initially been more of marketing buzzwords, the potential of AI in data management is clear – how can you manage something you don’t understand?  By using analytics to drive AI/ML, analytics driven data management solutions can continue to leverage the understanding of data to drive better management. This year, businesses will see more exciting developments in this space that leverage deep analytics and data lakes across different storage repositories to help them better manage their data.

As the new decade gets well underway, the amount of data produced, stored and analysed continues to rise. Because of this, businesses in every industry will need to work towards being able to manage this data wherever it resides, from a data centre all the way to the edge or even up in the cloud.

By Krishna Subramanian, COO at Komprise

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Jun 24, 2021

Legend: John McAfee

McAfee
Cybersecurity
Intel
2 min
A controversial figure, John McAfee is credited with starting an entire technology industry around cybersecurity

John McAfee is credited with starting the entire cybersecurity industry. In 1987, he set up McAfee Associates and released VirusScan. Previous antivirus programs had been released, but McAfee’s was the first with mass appeal and was soon a day zero (or at least day one) installation for Windows users as well as corporate clients.

McAfee: divisive

But McAfee was also a hugely divisive character. He dismissed his own software, claimed he never used it, and rejoiced when Intel bought McAfee and took his name off “the worst software on the planet.” He was anti-tax, pro-drugs, anti-war and pro-free trade. He was also a tireless crusader for cyber awareness, and set up a political party called the Cyber Party in order to make a bid for the office of president of the US.

“I am now everlastingly grateful to Intel for freeing me from this terrible association with the worst software on the planet”

McAfee: born in the UK

McAfee was born in Gloucestershire, UK, but moved to Salem, Virginia, where his American father (his mother was English) shot himself when McAfee was 15. McAfee worked at NASA, Univac, Xerox, Computer Sciences Corporation, Booz Allen Hamilton and Lockheed. It was while working at the latter he was given a copy of Brain, the first computer virus for PC, and began to engineer a defence.

McAfee: controversy

Controversy dogged McAfee. He was implicated as a ‘person of interest’ in the search for a neighbour who had been shot. He married a prostitute. He claimed a cocaine baron was writing his biography. He was arrested for possession of an unlicensed weapon and for manufacturing drugs in Belize (later released without charge). There were various other arrests (mainly weapons related) but not much would stick until McAfee’s anti-tax stance caught up with him. 

McAfee: arrest

He fled the US as tax authorities turned up the heat on at least four years of non payment of tax and was arrested (again) in Spain in October 2020 at the behest of the US Department of Justice. Charges for fraudulently promoting cryptocurrencies were soon added and he was formally indicted in March 2021. In June 2021, the Spanish National Court authorised McAfee’s extradition to the US, and McAfee was found dead in his cell just hours later in what is widely believed to be a suicide.

McAfee: death

Even in death, McAfee courted controversy, having announced that if he was ever found to have committed suicide, it would mean he had been murdered. A slew of conspiracy theories mushroomed in the hours after his death was announced. It’s just what he would have wanted.

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