Jun 1, 2020

Startup Spotlight: Cockroach Labs’ cloud database management

Cloud
Big Data
William Smith
2 min
Software firm Cockroach Labs offers a cloud SQL database for the management of critical data
Software firm Cockroach Labs offers a cloud SQL database for the management of critical data.

Founded in 2015 and based in New York, the company’s pr...

Software firm Cockroach Labs offers a cloud SQL database for the management of critical data. 

Founded in 2015 and based in New York, the company’s principal offering is CockroachDB, capable of operating across cloud, on-premise and hybrid environments.

The company’s customers include the likes of Comcast, WeWork, Lush, Bose and Baidu, and its approach has won it significant financial backing - over $195mn across six funding rounds. Its latest Series D was announced at the beginning of this month, raising $86.6mn in the round led by Bond and Altimeter capital. 

In a press release, Cockroach Labs’ CEO and co-founder Spencer Kimball said: "The migration to a multi-cloud environment has long been underway at many, if not all, of the top global enterprises. What cannot be taken for granted in the rush to the cloud is resiliency and scalability, which is near impossible to do without a distributed database that is elastic and self-healing.

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“It's a given that this is the way of the future. But as that future approaches faster than many expected it is putting immense pressure on the enterprise to make this leap now, as quickly and effortlessly as possible. CockroachDB was purpose-built for mission-critical, data-intensive, cloud-deployed applications, and as a result, we are seeing a tremendous increase in demand for our services from companies small and large looking for bulletproof resiliency, effortless scalability and an overall more cost-effective platform."

The company said it would use the funding to invest in R&D as customer needs change. The current COVID-19 pandemic has increased online demand for many businesses, as people across the world stay at home in lockdown. Accordingly, Cockroach Labs expects companies to move to more efficient and cloud-native tools such as its CockroachDB platform - highlighting sectors such as communications, gaming, ecommerce and financial services as having the most to gain.

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Jul 26, 2021

China announces 6-month campaign to clean up apps

Technology
China
Data
apps
2 min
China’s crackdown on tech companies seems to be expanding as the country’s industry minister launched a six-month campaign to clean up internet apps

A 6-month campaign has been announced by China’s industry minister, to clean up what it says are serious problems with internet apps violating consumer rights, cybersecurity and “disturbing market order.” 

In an online notice the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology said that, among other things, companies must fix pop-ups on apps that deceive and mislead users or force them to use services they might not want.

The order is all part of a wider effort to crack down on tech industries and police use of personal information. Authorities have recently ordered fines and other penalties for some of China’s biggest tech companies.

Earlier this month, the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) ordered online stores not to offer Didi's app, saying it illegally collected users' personal data. The company’s shares have now fallen by more than 40% since making its New York Stock Exchange debut on 30 June.

 

The latest campaign in the tech crackdown

 

The ministry launched this latest campaign with a teleconference call on Friday and issued its 15th list of dozens of apps it has said require fixing on Sunday. 

There are 22 specific scenarios it has said require ‘rectification’, among which the ministry mentioned pop-up windows as a specific problem, especially when all the screen of a pop-up window is a jump link with a false close button.

Other various problems it highlighted were threats to data security due to a failure to encrypt sensitive information while it is being transmitted, and failure to obtain users' consent before providing data to other parties; and malicious blocking of website links and interference with other companies products or services. 

It also took aim at illegal broadband networks, which it called “black broadband" that failed to conform to website filing procedures or might be subletting or using illegal access to networks.

Regulators have been stepping up enforcement of data security, financial and other rules against scores of tech companies that dominate entertainment, retail, and other industries.

 

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