Jan 19, 2021

StoreDot’s 5-minute charge batteries built on existing lines

StoreDot
Electric Vehicles
battery
autonomous vehicles
William Smith
2 min
StoreDot's batteries
The cells were produced on existing lithium-ion battery production lines operated by StoreDot’s Chinese partner EVE Energy...

Herzeliya, Israel-based StoreDot has announced the launch of a lithium-ion battery capable of charging in just five minutes.

The company’s so-called extremely fast charging (XFC) technology has been built into sample cells intended as a showcase to electric vehicle firms, with other potential uses in commercial drones and consumer electronics. The product has the potential of aiding in the adoption of electric vehicles by cutting down inconvenient charge times.

Commercial viability

Crucially, the cells were produced on existing lithium-ion battery production lines operated by StoreDot’s Chinese partner EVE Energy.

In a press release, Dr. Doron Myersdorf, CEO of StoreDot, said: “StoreDot continues to go from strength to strength as we get one step closer to making our vision of 5-minute charging of EVs a commercial reality. Our team of top scientists has overcome inherent challenges of XFC such as safety, cycle life and swelling by harnessing innovative materials and cell design. Today's announcement marks an important milestone, moving XFC for the first time beyond innovation in the lab to a commercially-viable product that is scalable for mass production. This paves the way for the launch of our second-generation, silicon-dominant anode prototype battery for electric vehicles later this year."

Battery innovation ramps up

The company has previously received backing from the likes of BP, Daimler, Samsung Ventures and TDK. It’s not the first time it has demonstrated its five-minute charging technology, with previous examples of a two-wheeled electric vehicle in 2019 and a drone in 2020. This, however, is the first time the product has been “commercially viable”

StoreDot’s announcement comes as Tesla, the world’s most valuable automotive company, shared a video of the production line for its new “tabless” battery cell, known as the 4680. The company also put out a notice that it was seeking to recruit people to its battery division, which it said was key to achieving the transition to sustainable energy.

(Image: StoreDot)

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May 12, 2021

The Online Safety Bill: What is it and what does it mean?

UK
Social Media
onlinesafetybill
Internet
2 min
The government's Online Safety Bill was announced yesterday in the Queen's Speech, but what exactly is it?

New internet laws will be published today in the UK in the draft Online Safety Bill to protect children online and tackle some of the worst abuse on social media, including racist hate crimes.

The draft legislation, which was previously known as the Online Harms Bill, has been two years in the making. Some new additions to the bill include provisions to tackle online scams, such as romance fraud and fake investment opportunities.

 

What does it include?

The draft Bill includes changes to put an end to harmful practices and brings in a new era of accountability and protections for democratic debate, including:

  • New additions to strengthen people’s rights to express themselves freely online, while protecting journalism and democratic political debate in the UK.

  • Further provisions to tackle prolific online scams such as romance fraud, which have seen people manipulated into sending money to fake identities on dating apps.

  • Social media sites, websites, apps and other services hosting user-generated content or allowing people to talk to others online must remove and limit the spread of illegal and harmful content such as child sexual abuse, terrorist material and suicide content.

  • Ofcom will be given the power to fine companies failing in a new duty of care up to £18 million or ten per cent of annual global turnover, whichever is higher, and have the power to block access to sites.

  • A new criminal offence for senior managers has been included as a deferred power. This could be introduced at a later date if tech firms don’t step up their efforts to improve safety.

Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden said: “Today the UK shows global leadership with our groundbreaking laws to usher in a new age of accountability for tech and bring fairness and accountability to the online world.

“We will protect children on the internet, crack down on racist abuse on social media, and through new measures to safeguard our liberties, create a truly democratic digital age.

The draft Bill will be scrutinised by a joint committee of MPs before a final version is formally introduced to Parliament.

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