Jun 22, 2020

What Will Happen At Apple’s WWDC Event?

Technology
Apple
Kayleigh Shooter
3 min
hands on keyboard
We take a look at what is going to happen at Apple’s virtual WWDC event, and what it will mean for software developers...

Apple's iconic WWDC event is going to be hosted virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic and is scheduled to begin at 6 pm UK time when Apple is expected to announce a large range of software updates, which will include the new version of the iPhone operating system, iOS 14 - which rumours suggest might be renamed iPhone OS.

Health is at the front of everyone's minds so not only is the event being hosted online for the sake of public health, but Apple is also rumoured to be trying out a helpful hand wash monitoring function on the Apple Watch to encourage hand washing and limit the spread of the coronavirus.

One of the biggest changes the company is anticipated to announce will bring its Mac laptops in line with its iPads and iPhones in using processors based on Apple's own designs, rather than Intel's. The change is not expected to hit Apple's Macs immediately as it will take developers a bit of time to adapt their apps to get to grips with the new architecture. Also being rumoured to be among the announcements at WWDC is a new iMac computer in addition to the possible announcement of over-the-ear AirPods and a new AppleTV.

However, mostly Apple's hardware product announcements come in September when Apple usually announces the latest models of its iPhone and other gadgets and devices. The technology giant will be streaming the event on YouTube and viewers will be able to follow along with a Sky News live blog, keeping track of the big announcements and how they shape up against the competition.

Apple might also debut its new AR app, Gobi, that will be able to scan colourful new special QR codes from the company. In addition, the company will add new features in the "Find My" app to include sound and vibration cues to help you locate your device. For iPadOS, Apple is expected to bring cursor support smart keyboard attachments along with compatibility for gesture control.

In addition to the handwashing feature for the Apple Watch, one of the most anticipated features Apple could launch today is blood oxygen tracking. Also, Apple might also bring sleep tracking to the Apple Watch. This might persuade people to purchase the Apple Watch over its competitors such as FitBit and Garmin.

How to watch:

Tickets for the event are normally $1,599 per ticket, but it is free to stream this year. You can tune in on YouTube here. In addition, the event will be streaming from some of the usual sources, including Apple.com, the Apple Developer App, and the Apple TV app. If you use a Windows PC, Apple’s video player officially supports Microsoft’s Edge browser. Will you be tuning in?
 

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Jun 18, 2021

Start-ups receive $60 billion investment, smash 2020 record

techstartups
investment
Technology
Laura Berrill
2 min
Europe’s tech sector start-ups attracted more venture capital investment in 2021 than the whole of 2020 with the UK leading in tech policy

Start-ups on the continent have raised a massive 43.8 billion euros ($60.9 billion) in just the first six months of 2021, according to figures from Dealroom, surpassing the record 38.5 billion euros invested last year..

This is despite the fact that the number of venture deals signed so far is around half the amount agreed in 2020. Only about 2,700 funding rounds have been raised so far this year, compared to 5,200 last year.

Prime examples in times of change

Examples are Swedish buy-now-pay-later firm Klarna which has raised more than $1.6 billion in two financing rounds, the German stock trading app Trade Republic received $900 million in May and British payments provider Checkout.com snapped up $450 million at the start of the year.

The figures suggest that European tech firms are pulling in far larger sums of money per investment than in previous years, which defies the economic uncertainty of the pandemic and boosted online services enormously.

The CEO of Checkout.com, Guillaume Pousaz, said start-ups have often been created in times of crisis, citing the emergence of several new financial technology companies in the wake of the 2008 global financial crisis.

He added that big transformational change was often the time when there is the emergence of a lot of new start-ups, sometimes when people are losing their jobs for associated reasons.

UK leading the charge

Scale-Up Europe, a group that includes the founders of UiPath and Wise, proposed 21 recommendations to help the region build “the next generation of tech giants.” Among the suggestions are tax credits to corporates for investing in start-ups and regulatory changes that adapt to new innovations.

Sebastian Siemiatkowski, CEO of Klarna, said the U.K. leads Europe when it comes to tech policy, and that there were a number of regulatory issues needing to be addressed before the European Union can produce tech giants of its own.

Siemiatkowski highlighted EU regulation of web cookies as an example of “poor regulation.” Yet, as the number of $1 billion start-ups in Europe continues to grow, the number of exits in the continent is also increasing. 

This year has already seen some notable acquisitions, including Etsy’s $1.6 billion purchase of U.K. fashion resale app Depop and JPMorgan’s takeover of London robo-advisor Nutmeg.

As for stock market listings, a number of notable debuts have taken place in London in particular, including food delivery app Deliveroo, cybersecurity firm Darktrace and reviews site Trustpilot. Money transfer giant Wise, formerly known as TransferWise, plans to go public in the U.K. capital soon.

 

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