Feb 3, 2021

Who is Andy Jassy, soon to replace Jeff Bezos as Amazon CEO?

Amazon
Jeff Bezos
CEO
Andy Jassy
William Smith
2 min
The 52-year-old Jassy is a long-term veteran of the company, having co-founded Amazon Web Services (AWS) in 2003
The 52-year-old Jassy is a long-term veteran of the company, having co-founded Amazon Web Services (AWS) in 2003...

Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos has announced he is to step down as Amazon CEO starting in Q3 2021.

Moving into the role of Executive Chair, he is to be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of Amazon’s hugely successful cloud business, Amazon Web Services (AWS).

The inside hire

The 52-year-old Jassy is a long-term veteran of the company, having joined the company in 1997, fresh off an MBA at Harvard. In 2003, he was one of the founders of AWS, rising to the role of CEO in 2016. He has overseen the business as it has become increasingly crucial to the company. In its latest results, for instance, Amazon reported that AWS accounted for 10% of sales and a whopping 52% of profits.

Bezos is quite famous for his strong opinions on management, including a “two pizza rule” for meeting size. Jassy’s perspective is less well known, but in an interview with CERAWeek, he said: “If you want to invent and you want people to take chances and work on new initiatives, you have to be able to tolerate failure. None of us like failure at Amazon. But if you don't allow people to take chances and have an opportunity if it doesn't work out to be able to move on to something great, it's a self-fulfilling prophecy: none of the good people work on the new things because it will be too risky.”

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Bye bye Bezos?

The announcement came alongside Amazon’s quarterly results, with Bezos noting the inventiveness of the company as being a good opportunity to step down: “If you do it right, a few years after a surprising invention, the new thing has become normal. People yawn. That yawn is the greatest compliment an inventor can receive. When you look at our financial results, what you’re actually seeing are the long-run cumulative results of invention. Right now I see Amazon at its most inventive ever, making it an optimal time for this transition.”

The move will see Bezos less involved in the day-to-day running of the company, as he turns his attention to his other projects, including space company Blue Origin. Bezos’ affection for that business is well known, having previously described it as “the most important work” that he’s doing.

(Image: Amazon)

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May 7, 2021

Improving Skill Initiatives in Technology Businesses in 2021

skills
Technology
Business
upskilling
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director...
4 min
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director of Global Emerging Talent & Reskill Operations at mthree talks us through the skills needed in today's job market.
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director of Global Emerging Talent & Reskill Operations at mthree talks us through the skills needed in today's job market...

According to Tech Nation’s most recent report, UK technology companies now employ more than 2.93 million people, with the sector seeing a 40% growth in the last two years. The new world of work and the uptick in digitalisation caused by the pandemic with the mass uptake of digital services and online communications has meant that the technology sector has seen a huge demand for specific skills across the job market.

Whilst many businesses have done well to adapt to the digital transformation witnessed over the last few years, this rapid advancement of technology has also resulted in widespread difficulties recruiting experienced tech employees. McKinsey reported that over 87% of organisations have reported huge digital skills gaps, which suggest that whilst most tech businesses are aware of and actively trying to tackle these issues, many are struggling to do so effectively.

To remain competitive and overcome this shortage of skilled workers, technology businesses must look at how they can upskill current employees, move employees to new areas of the business, and ensure their technology talent is as up to date as possible. 

So how can tech businesses stay ahead of the skills curve this year? 

Make an inventory of desired skills – and offer training for them

To introduce effective skilling programmes within technology businesses, management teams should identify and agree on skills that the business is in greatest need of – both in the immediate and longer terms. 

Over the past three years, demand for tech skills such as AI, cyber and cloud automation has accelerated, with AI and cyber in particular growing by 44% and 22% year on year, respectively, from 2019. For many tech businesses, these skills will continue to be desirable for the business to progress, and senior leadership teams must agree on what skills the business wants to prioritise in its workforce.

Next, management teams should then look to create an inventory of these desired skills and also identify what job roles need to be introduced to further this expertise within the business. This can be done through hiring external candidates or even introducing a programme that current employees can take to develop these particular skills.

This technique requires technology businesses to be malleable in their approach, and they can therefore look to introduce training that builds on these skills gaps or even move employees around the business to utilise their existing skills in areas that are most needed.

Incentivise the workforce

Finally, a good way to develop the skills available amongst the workforce in a technology business is to ensure employees are excited about the prospect. If new candidates and existing members of the team feel included in the approach, can see a benefit in taking additional training and feel motivated to further their own career progression, this could be the tech companies’ strongest asset.

For example, companies such as Amazon have set the bar for investing in reskilling and upskilling to keep their entire workforce motivated and, most importantly, up-to-speed. As many people join Amazon, some without any previous educational qualifications to some possessing PHDs, the business’s skilling programme is provided to give all employees the skills they need to either move up at Amazon or move on to a qualified position outside of the company. By offering this training, employees are motivated to think of their own career and future, and Amazon has the benefit of seeing the operational and financial benefits of a skilled, engaged workforce.

According to recent research completed by Robert Half, software development, cloud migration and project management experience are top of the list for hiring managers in 2021, with tech-specific skills being some of the most in-demand across all sectors. The pandemic has undoubtedly accelerated this increased demand for technology skills and talent, and industry leaders are at a pivotal stage to ensure their workers’ skills sets are up-to-date and being utilised effectively within the business.

For tech businesses that wish to attract this new talent as well as keeping current employees engaged and competitive within the industry, bosses must not only incentivise their workers with skilling programmes, but they must work to identify what skills they are in most need of and then put the necessary training programmes in place.

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