Aug 25, 2020

What’s next for 5G & Huawei - China VS The World

5G
Technology
Kayleigh Shooter
2 min
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As the ongoing battle against Huawei rages on, we are left wondering what is next for the company and the deployment of 5G...

 Huawei is a Chinese technology and telecommunications company, who specialises in designing, developing, and selling telecommunications equipment and consumer electronics, mainly mobile telephones. The company's roots trace back to its founding in 1987 by Ren Zhengfei. The company's initial aim was to focus on manufacturing phone switches however it has expanded its focus and expertise to include, building telecommunications networks, providing operational and consulting services and equipment to corporations inside and outside of China, and manufacturing communications devices for the wider consumer market. The company has around 18% of the market in its grasp, ahead of Apple and other companies alike.

The main question at the front of everyone's mind, and the one that has fueled this feud, is "Can the West trust Huawei or will us using its equipment leave communication networks, and our own mobile phones, vulnerable?" The US believes that China will use Huawei for spying via its 5G technology, consequently, Washington has banned US firms from doing business with Huawei.

Whilst Huawei takes a back seat, there are many alternatives to the company, for example, buyers in the United States will favour and be able to purchase from some high fledged telecommunications companies, already established as safe, such as Cisco or Qualcomm. Over the pond in Europe, 5G manufacturers will most likely include companies such as Ericsson and Nokia. The United Kingdom government says it will look at "multiple vendors" and will bring forward a Telecoms Security Bill in the autumn.

As the company continues to be in hot water, it has been revealed that they have a contingency plan B. This plan has been revealed as “HarmonyOS” which was developed as soon as the US feud commenced, HarmonyOS was first, officially, revealed at the company's Developer Conference back in August of 2019. The innovative tool is described as a microkernel-based, distributed operating system, which is designed to run across all types of devices. The tool is reportedly able to run on low power devices which gives it a competitive edge and may be a glimmer of hope for Huawei.

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Jun 21, 2021

Tech Corporations Fight for Alternative ESG Filings

Alphabet
Apple
Microsoft
ESG
Elise Leise
3 min
In a letter to the SEC, Alphabet, Amazon, and Intel pushed back against ESG disclosures in 10ks—asking for more flexible timelines and reporting standards

In 2021, almost a third of global equity inflow went into ESG funds, according to the Bank of America. In April alone, ESG assets hit US$1.4tn, growing at 3x the rate of non-ESG funds. And although it seems like solar panel and electric car firms should take the cake for sustainable investment, it’s actually the world’s largest tech firms that command the market. 

 

The Wall Street Journal reported that the most commonly held S&P 500 stocks in actively managed sustainable equity funds include Microsoft, Alphabet, and Apple. So it struck many as odd that in a June 11th letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), Alphabet requested that ESG information not be disclosed in annual 10k filings.

 

Who Signed The Letter? 

Only some of the most influential tech giants in the world...

 

 

To be fair, these companies aren’t against ESG and sustainable business. ‘Collectively, we purchase more than 21 gigawatts of clean energy and many of us are members of the UN Race to Zero and America is All In campaigns’, the joint letter to the SEC stated. ‘Each company has an individual goal to procure 100% renewable energy’. 

 

Then Why Protest? 

According to the tech companies, filing ESG information might open them up to legal risks. After all, sustainability reporting relies on estimates and assumptions that involve uncertainty—and governance issues such as fair labour are much harder to track than annual financial data. ‘It is important not to subject companies to undue liability’, the companies wrote

 

Instead of reporting ESG data in their annual 10k filings, Alphabet et. al suggest that the SEC should allow for new climate-related reporting outside of the current annual or quarterly schedules. By adjusting the reporting frequency and timing, they argue, companies can provide a better and more accurate measure of how they’re doing with ESG. 

 

Who Opposes Alternative ESG Reporting? 

For the most part, asset managers aren’t thrilled. Pimco, Invesco, and other major asset funds want ESG information disclosed—the standard way. As of right now, the SEC still intends to make ESG 10k filings mandatory. ‘[Alphabet] positions itself as a sustainability leader’, said Josh Zinner, CEO of the Interfaith Centre on Corporate Responsibility. Added Molly Betounray, Director of Shareholder Advocacy at Clean Yield Asset Management: ‘While it’s great to see corporate ESG leaders advocating for climate disclosure standards, we disagree with their assertion that these disclosures should fall outside current standard SEC filings’. 

 

What’s the Verdict? 

Maybe Alphabet, Amazon, and Intel are honestly trying to frame ESG reporting in a new light. As Patrick Flynn, Vice President for Sustainability at Salesforce said: ‘[ESG disclosure] is a new process for companies to go through, and they’ll need to establish new procedures. Allowing for some sort of safe harbour from liability…[allows] companies to push in willingly and not just do the bare minimum’. 

 

In their letter to the SEC, these companies chose to recommend several concrete actions: 

 

 

In short: before we mandate ESG reporting, the SEC should at least think twice about how to design it.

 

 

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