Jan 18, 2021

Explained: Google and Nokia’s cloud-native 5G partnership

Paddy Smith
3 min
Are partnerships the future of cloud-native 5G? Credit: Getty
What does Google’s tie-up with Nokia tell us about the future of cloud-native 5G technology...

Google and Nokia are jointly developing cloud-native 5G solutions for communications and enterprise. But what does that mean for the future of connectivity?

Cloud-native 5G specialisms

Nokia’s Nordic bedfellow in telecoms equipment, Ericsson, tried to create its own edge cloud network, Edge Gravity, but pulled the plug once it became clear it couldn’t compete with larger cloud providers such as Google and Amazon. Nokia’s move will have been informed by that misstep. It’s likely the Finnish telco had explored going it alone, but was deterred by the might of Big Internet, and its neighbour’s lack of success.

So big tech can’t be beaten in the cloud space?

That’s one way of looking at it, but it’s interesting that Google has drawn up a strategic partnership with Nokia helping to develop products and a recognition perhaps it doesn’t have the network expertise to rely on its cloud clout. There’s little doubt that Nokia is the littler fish in this arrangement, but it could be key to Google’s competitiveness in cloud-native 5G.

Is the partnership necessary?

It’s feasible for customers to buy into the networking and cloud solutions separately, but it increases complexity for procurement and onboarding. By buying a one-box solution, companies will be hoping to reduce installation snagging and streamline the buying process. At least, that’s what Nokia and Google will hope.

So we’ll see more cloud tie-ups in future?

It’s likely. Vodafone is planning to launch a solution this year with Amazon as partner and others are likely to follow. If the trend snowballs, we could see attempts by big tech to absorb divisions of networking companies in an attempt to consolidate as cloud networking becomes intrinsic to enterprise IT.

What’s been said about the Nokia/Google partnership?

George Nazi, VP, telco, media and entertainment industry solutions at Google Cloud, said: “Communications service providers have a tremendous opportunity ahead of them to support businesses’ digital transformations at the network edge through both 5G connectivity and cloud-native applications and capabilities. Doing so requires modernised infrastructure, built for a cloud-native 5G core, and we’re proud to partner with Nokia to help the telecommunications industry expand and support these customers.”

Alex Choi, SVP, strategy and technology innovation at Deutsche Telekom, said: “Deutsche Telekom is on a journey to transform to a new open, disaggregated and cloud-native infrastructure with an automated production model. We are therefore excited to see two innovative organizations like Nokia and Google Cloud joining forces to accelerate ecosystem innovation across critical areas like Open RAN and virtual RAN and the cloud-native 5G Core.”

Neil McRae, chief architect at BT Group, said: “BT is deploying cloud-native technologies across our platform, creating value for our customers and ensuring they get the best network experience in every aspect of their daily lives, whether at home, on the move or at work. The network and the services that our customers depend upon in their everyday lives can be further enhanced in terms of scalability, reliability, and experience with cloud-native technologies. BT is excited that Google and Nokia are innovating together to help accelerate new, on-demand edge and convergence solutions, creating new possibilities for consumers and enterprises.”

Ron Haberman, CTO of cloud and network services at Nokia, said: “In the past five years, the telecom industry has evolved from physical appliances to virtual network functions and now cloud-native solutions. Nokia is excited to work with Google Cloud in service of our customers, both CSPs and enterprise, to provide choice and freedom to run workloads on premise and in the public cloud. Cloud-native network functions and automation will enable new agility and use-cases in the 5G era.”

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Jun 15, 2021

IT Employees Predict 90% Increase in Cloud Security Spending

Technology
Cloud
Cybersecurity
Investments
Elise Leise
3 min
Companies that took the initiative on cloud platforms are trying to cope with the security risks, according to Devo Technology’s report

As companies get back on their feet post-pandemic, they’re going all-in on cloud applications. In a recent report by Devo Technology titled “Beyond Cloud Adoption: How to Embrace the Cloud for Security and Business Benefits”, 81% of the 500 IT and security team members surveyed said that COVID accelerated their cloud timelines. More than half of the top-performing businesses reported gains in visibility. In fact, the cloud now outnumbers on-premise solutions at a 3:1 ratio

But the benefits are accompanied by significant cybersecurity risks, as cloud infrastructure is more complex than legacy systems. Let’s dive in. 

 

Why Are Cloud Platforms Taking Over? 

According to Forrester, the public cloud infrastructure market could grow 28% over the next year, up to US$113.1bn. Companies shifting to remote work and decentralised workplaces find it easy to store and access information, especially as networks start to share more and more supply chain and enterprise information—think risk mitigation platforms and ESG ratings. 

Here’s the catch: when you shift to the cloud, you choose a more complex system, which often requires cloud-native platforms for network security. In other words, you can’t stop halfway. ‘Only cloud-native platforms can keep up with [the cloud’s] speed and complexity” and ultimately increase visibility and control’, said Douglas Murray, CEO at cloud security provider Valtix. 

Here’s a quick list of the top cloud security companies, as ranked by Software Testing Help: 

 

What are the Security Issues? 

Here’s the bad news. According to Accenture, less than 40% of companies have achieved the full value they expected on their cloud investments. All-in greater complexity has forced companies to spend more to hire skilled tech workers, analyse security data, and manage new cybersecurity threats. 

The two main issues are (1) a lack of familiarity with cloud systems and (2) challenges with shifting legacy security systems to new platforms. Out of the 500 IT employees from Devo Technology’s cloud report, for example, 80% said they’d sorted 40% more security data, suffered from a lack of cloud security training, and experienced a 60% increase in cybersecurity threats. 

How Will Companies React? 

They certainly won’t stop investing in cloud platforms. Out of the 500 enterprise-level companies that Devo Technology talked to throughout North America and Western Europe, 90% anticipated a jump in cloud security spending in 2021. They’ll throw money at automating security processes and investing in security upskilling programmes. 

After all, company executives will find it incredibly difficult to stick with legacy systems when some cloud-centred companies have found success. Since moving from Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) offerings to the cloud, Accenture has saved up to 70% on its processes; recently, the company announced that it would invest US$3bn to help its clients ‘realise the cloud’s business value, speed, cost, talent, and innovation benefits’. 


The company stated: ‘Security is often seen as the biggest inhibitor to a cloud-first journey—but in reality, it can be its greatest accelerator’. 

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