Aug 21, 2020

What is cloud computing?

Technology
Cloud
Cloud Computing
Kayleigh Shooter
2 min
cloud
We take a close look at what exactly is meant by cloud computing...

 We have worked with some of the world's largest cloud computing companies but what exactly is meant by that term? Cloud computing, simply put, is the delivery of computing services which includes but is not limited to servers, storage, databases, networking, software, analytics and intelligence. All of this takes place in the cloud which allows for faster innovation, flexible resources and economies of scale. Typically with cloud computing, you only pay for cloud services you use, helping you lower your operating costs, run your infrastructure more efficiently and scale as your business needs change.

Cloud computing has many benefits, the first one being that the majority of cloud computing services are provided as self-service and also on demand, so even vast amounts of computing resources and information can be provisioned in very quickly, even in a couple of minutes, typically with just a few clicks of your mouse, giving businesses a lot of flexibility and taking the pressure off capacity planning.

Lots of cloud providers offer a broad set of policies, technologies and controls that strengthen your security posture overall, helping to protect your data, apps and infrastructure from potential cyber threats. Lastly, cloud computing makes data backup, disaster recovery and business continuity easier and less expensive, saving you time and money along the way. 

There are three types of cloud computing; Public, private and hybrid. Public clouds are owned and operated by third-party cloud service providers, private clouds are cloud computing resources used exclusively by a single business or organisation to meet its exclusive needs. Finally, hybrid clouds combine public and private clouds, which are connected together by technology that allows data and applications to be shared between them.

There are many innovative uses of cloud computing. One example is to create cloud-native applications and quickly build, deploy and scale them. Cloud computing can also be used to store, back up and recover data in a cost-effective way. Lastly, cloud computing allows you to analyse data and unify it across teams, divisions and locations in the cloud. 

Share article

Jun 15, 2021

IT Employees Predict 90% Increase in Cloud Security Spending

Technology
Cloud
Cybersecurity
Investments
Elise Leise
3 min
Companies that took the initiative on cloud platforms are trying to cope with the security risks, according to Devo Technology’s report

As companies get back on their feet post-pandemic, they’re going all-in on cloud applications. In a recent report by Devo Technology titled “Beyond Cloud Adoption: How to Embrace the Cloud for Security and Business Benefits”, 81% of the 500 IT and security team members surveyed said that COVID accelerated their cloud timelines. More than half of the top-performing businesses reported gains in visibility. In fact, the cloud now outnumbers on-premise solutions at a 3:1 ratio

But the benefits are accompanied by significant cybersecurity risks, as cloud infrastructure is more complex than legacy systems. Let’s dive in. 

 

Why Are Cloud Platforms Taking Over? 

According to Forrester, the public cloud infrastructure market could grow 28% over the next year, up to US$113.1bn. Companies shifting to remote work and decentralised workplaces find it easy to store and access information, especially as networks start to share more and more supply chain and enterprise information—think risk mitigation platforms and ESG ratings. 

Here’s the catch: when you shift to the cloud, you choose a more complex system, which often requires cloud-native platforms for network security. In other words, you can’t stop halfway. ‘Only cloud-native platforms can keep up with [the cloud’s] speed and complexity” and ultimately increase visibility and control’, said Douglas Murray, CEO at cloud security provider Valtix. 

Here’s a quick list of the top cloud security companies, as ranked by Software Testing Help: 

 

What are the Security Issues? 

Here’s the bad news. According to Accenture, less than 40% of companies have achieved the full value they expected on their cloud investments. All-in greater complexity has forced companies to spend more to hire skilled tech workers, analyse security data, and manage new cybersecurity threats. 

The two main issues are (1) a lack of familiarity with cloud systems and (2) challenges with shifting legacy security systems to new platforms. Out of the 500 IT employees from Devo Technology’s cloud report, for example, 80% said they’d sorted 40% more security data, suffered from a lack of cloud security training, and experienced a 60% increase in cybersecurity threats. 

How Will Companies React? 

They certainly won’t stop investing in cloud platforms. Out of the 500 enterprise-level companies that Devo Technology talked to throughout North America and Western Europe, 90% anticipated a jump in cloud security spending in 2021. They’ll throw money at automating security processes and investing in security upskilling programmes. 

After all, company executives will find it incredibly difficult to stick with legacy systems when some cloud-centred companies have found success. Since moving from Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) offerings to the cloud, Accenture has saved up to 70% on its processes; recently, the company announced that it would invest US$3bn to help its clients ‘realise the cloud’s business value, speed, cost, talent, and innovation benefits’. 


The company stated: ‘Security is often seen as the biggest inhibitor to a cloud-first journey—but in reality, it can be its greatest accelerator’. 

Share article