People are turning to technology to help define their future

A global study carried out by Oracle has found that over 75% of people feel “stuck” personally and professionally, and are turning to technology for help

Oracle, an American multinational computer technology corporation, and Workplace Intelligence, a HR research and advisory firm, have discovered that people are now turning to robots instead of humans for support in career development. 

The study carried out by the companies, of more than 14,600 employees, managers, HR leaders, and C-level executives across 13 countries found that people all around the world have felt stuck in their personal and professional lives but are ready to regain control of their futures.

"The past year and a half changed how we work including where we work and, for a lot of people, who we work for. While there have been a lot of challenges for both employees and employers, this has been an opportunity to change the workplace for the better," said Dan Schawbel, managing partner, Workplace Intelligence.

 

The workforce feels lonely and disconnected

More than a year in lockdown and the continued uncertainty due to the pandemic have left many workers feeling like their lives and careers are out of control.

  • 80% of people have been negatively impacted by the last year, with many struggling financially (29%); suffering from declining mental health (28%); lacking career motivation (25%); and feeling disconnected from their own lives (23%).
  • 62% found 2021 to be the most stressful year at work ever. More than half (52%) of people struggled with mental health at work more in 2021 than in 2020.

 

People are motivated to make changes but are facing challenges

Despite struggles over the last year, people around the world are eager to make changes in their professional lives.

  • 83% of people are ready to make a change, but 76% said they are facing major obstacles. The biggest hurdles include financial instability (22%); not knowing what career change makes sense for them (20%); not feeling confident enough to make a change (20%); and seeing no growth opportunities at their company (20%).
  • However, 85% of the global workforce are not satisfied with their employer’s support. They are looking for organisations to provide more learning and skills development (34%); higher salaries (31%); and opportunities for new roles within their company (30%).

 

Employees are turning to technology for help

To retain and gain more top talent amidst changing workplace dynamics, employers need to pay attention to employee needs more than ever before and leverage technology to provide better support.

  • 85% of people want technology to help define their future by identifying skills they need to develop (36%); recommending ways to learn new skills (36%); and providing next steps to progress towards career goals (32%).
  • 75% of people would make life changes based on robot recommendations.
  • 82% believe robots can support their careers better than a human by giving unbiased recommendations (37%); quickly answering questions about their career (33%); or finding new jobs that fit their current skills (32%).
  • 87% of people believe their company should be doing more to listen to their needs and 55 percent are more likely to stay with a company that uses advanced technologies like AI to support career growth.

"The evolving nature of the workplace shifted the way people think about success and reset people's expectations for how organisations can best support them. To attract and retain talent, businesses need to place a higher priority on helping employees identify and develop new skills and provide personalised career journeys so they can feel in control of their careers again," said Yvette Cameron, senior vice president, Oracle Cloud HCM. 

 

Share

Featured Articles

Exec Q&A with Karl Cheng, TMT Sector Leader of EY-Parthenon

Karl Cheng is Americas Technology, Media and Entertainment and Telecommunications (TMT) Sector Leader for EY-Parthenon, the global strategy consulting firm

Executive Q&A with CEO Guy Levy-Yurista of Synthace

Chief Executive Officer of Synthace, Guy Levy-Yurista, Ph.D, shares how the cloud-based Sythnace is changing the game for scientists within R&D

Executive Q&A with Shuki Licht, SVP & CIO, Finastra

As SVP and Chief Innovation Officer Shuki Licht discusses life at Finastra, a provider of financial software applications, open-platform and marketplaces

Profits continue to soar for Belfast-based IT firm Kainos

Digital Transformation

Executive Q&A with Ciaran Dynes, CPO of Matillion

Cloud & Cybersecurity

Executive Q&A with Tom Homer, President, GTT

Enterprise IT