Jul 8, 2020

Box: secure, collaborative cloud content management

William Smith
2 min
Box, the Redwood City, California-based collaboration provider offers enterprises the ability to share and jointly work on files securely
Box, the Redwood City, California-based collaboration provider offers enterprises the ability to share and jointly work on files securely...

Box, the Redwood City, California-based collaboration provider offers enterprises the ability to share and jointly work on files securely.

The company’s products include solutions for cloud file security such as intelligent threat detection, collaboration, including with partners and vendors outside the organisation, as well as workflow automation.

Its customers include the likes of Broadcom, Morgan Stanley, General Electric, AstraZeneca, Intuit and Allstate.

Recently, the company has integrated automated malware detection into its Box Shield product. The technology will automatically alert end users, IT and security teams when malware is detected, alongside restricting downloads and file sharing.

In a press release, Jeetu Patel, Chief Product Officer, said: “With average cost of an attack reaching $2.6 million, malware has become one of the costliest security incidents facing businesses. Leveraging Box's unique preview technology, the automated controls in Box Shield minimize the impact of malware while allowing users to preview content without getting compromised. Additionally, the intelligent security alerts help enterprises act on the issue in minutes. These advances make it easier than ever to protect your business without getting in the way of work.”

An example of Box’s effect can be found in its work with implantable hearing solutions firm MED-EL, as the company’s Chief Digital Officer Martin Hairer explained. “As you can imagine for us with our business partners and clinics, data and information, exchange and collaboration is a very important topic. Everything we can improve in that regard has a tremendous impact on cost savings and quality and outcomes for the users. Before our cloud transformation here at MED-EL, we tried to maintain everything with data exchange tools. It's horrible to do this on your own. You need an army of cybersecurity specialists who keep only one tool up and running safely, and that’s exactly where Box came in. It provides us a really nice way to collaborate across the company and partners.”

You can read more about that work here, in our digital report. 

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May 7, 2021

Improving Skill Initiatives in Technology Businesses in 2021

skills
Technology
Business
upskilling
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director...
4 min
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director of Global Emerging Talent & Reskill Operations at mthree talks us through the skills needed in today's job market.
Becs Roycroft, Senior Director of Global Emerging Talent & Reskill Operations at mthree talks us through the skills needed in today's job market...

According to Tech Nation’s most recent report, UK technology companies now employ more than 2.93 million people, with the sector seeing a 40% growth in the last two years. The new world of work and the uptick in digitalisation caused by the pandemic with the mass uptake of digital services and online communications has meant that the technology sector has seen a huge demand for specific skills across the job market.

Whilst many businesses have done well to adapt to the digital transformation witnessed over the last few years, this rapid advancement of technology has also resulted in widespread difficulties recruiting experienced tech employees. McKinsey reported that over 87% of organisations have reported huge digital skills gaps, which suggest that whilst most tech businesses are aware of and actively trying to tackle these issues, many are struggling to do so effectively.

To remain competitive and overcome this shortage of skilled workers, technology businesses must look at how they can upskill current employees, move employees to new areas of the business, and ensure their technology talent is as up to date as possible. 

So how can tech businesses stay ahead of the skills curve this year? 

Make an inventory of desired skills – and offer training for them

To introduce effective skilling programmes within technology businesses, management teams should identify and agree on skills that the business is in greatest need of – both in the immediate and longer terms. 

Over the past three years, demand for tech skills such as AI, cyber and cloud automation has accelerated, with AI and cyber in particular growing by 44% and 22% year on year, respectively, from 2019. For many tech businesses, these skills will continue to be desirable for the business to progress, and senior leadership teams must agree on what skills the business wants to prioritise in its workforce.

Next, management teams should then look to create an inventory of these desired skills and also identify what job roles need to be introduced to further this expertise within the business. This can be done through hiring external candidates or even introducing a programme that current employees can take to develop these particular skills.

This technique requires technology businesses to be malleable in their approach, and they can therefore look to introduce training that builds on these skills gaps or even move employees around the business to utilise their existing skills in areas that are most needed.

Incentivise the workforce

Finally, a good way to develop the skills available amongst the workforce in a technology business is to ensure employees are excited about the prospect. If new candidates and existing members of the team feel included in the approach, can see a benefit in taking additional training and feel motivated to further their own career progression, this could be the tech companies’ strongest asset.

For example, companies such as Amazon have set the bar for investing in reskilling and upskilling to keep their entire workforce motivated and, most importantly, up-to-speed. As many people join Amazon, some without any previous educational qualifications to some possessing PHDs, the business’s skilling programme is provided to give all employees the skills they need to either move up at Amazon or move on to a qualified position outside of the company. By offering this training, employees are motivated to think of their own career and future, and Amazon has the benefit of seeing the operational and financial benefits of a skilled, engaged workforce.

According to recent research completed by Robert Half, software development, cloud migration and project management experience are top of the list for hiring managers in 2021, with tech-specific skills being some of the most in-demand across all sectors. The pandemic has undoubtedly accelerated this increased demand for technology skills and talent, and industry leaders are at a pivotal stage to ensure their workers’ skills sets are up-to-date and being utilised effectively within the business.

For tech businesses that wish to attract this new talent as well as keeping current employees engaged and competitive within the industry, bosses must not only incentivise their workers with skilling programmes, but they must work to identify what skills they are in most need of and then put the necessary training programmes in place.

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