Jun 19, 2020

Company Spotlight: Who Is Lenovo?

Technology
Kayleigh Shooter
3 min
computer screen
We take a look at the technology giant Lenovo, and how it has grown from nothing to being a global technology corporation...

Business Overview:

Lenovo Group Limited, often shortened to Lenovo (/lɛˈnoʊvoʊ/ leh-NOH-voh), is a Chinese multinational technology company that is headquartered in Beijing. The company designs, develops, manufactures, and sells personal computers, tablet computers, smartphones, workstations, servers, electronic storage devices, IT management software, and smart televisions. Lenovo is the world's largest personal computer vendor by unit sales, as of March 2019. It markets the ThinkPad and ThinkBook business lines of notebook computers; IdeaPad, Yoga, and Legion consumer lines of notebook laptops; and the IdeaCentre and ThinkCentre lines of desktops. Lenovo has operations in more than 60 countries and sells its products in around 160 countries. Lenovo's principal facilities are in Beijing and Morrisville (North Carolina, U.S.), with research centres in Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Xiamen, Chengdu, Nanjing, Wuhan, Yamato (Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan), and Morrisville. It also has a joint venture with NEC, Lenovo NEC Holdings, which produces personal computers for the Japanese market.

Lenovo and IBM:

Lenovo acquired IBM's personal computer business in 2005, including the ThinkPad laptop and tablet lines. Lenovo's acquisition of IBM's personal computer division accelerated access to foreign markets while improving both Lenovo's branding and technology. Lenovo paid US$1.25 billion for IBM's computer business and assumed an additional US$500 million of IBM's debt. This acquisition made Lenovo the third-largest computer maker worldwide by volume.

In regards to the purchase of IBM's personal computer division, Liu Chuanzhi said, "We benefited in three ways from the IBM acquisition. We got the ThinkPad brand, IBM's more advanced PC manufacturing technology and the company's international resources, such as its global sales channels and operation teams. These three elements have shored up our sales revenue in the past several years." IBM acquired an 18.9% shareholding in Lenovo in 2005 as part of Lenovo's purchase of IBM's personal computing division. Since then, IBM has steadily reduced its holdings of Lenovo stock. In July 2008, IBM's interest in Lenovo fell below the 5% threshold that mandates public disclosure.

IBM sold its Intel-based server lines, including IBM System x and IBM BladeCenter, to Lenovo in 2014. Lenovo says it will gain access to more enterprise customers, improve its profit margins, and develop a closer relationship with Intel, the maker of most server processors, through its acquisition of IBM's x86-based server business.

Lenovo and COVID-19:
Lenovo's Chief Executive Officer has issued the following statement regarding coronavirus:

"The spread of COVID-19 over the last two months continues to affect all of us. Even as progress is made and offices in some countries reopen, colleagues in other parts of the world are being asked to work from home, a reminder that this is an ever-changing, global issue that we all must work together to confront and overcome.

At Lenovo, we strive every day to bring smarter technology to all. That stems from our belief that putting the best technology in the hands of more people leads to better ideas and solutions to all of our challenges. Now more than ever, we are seeing the value of having the right technology, whether it is a medical researcher working on a vaccine, a teacher leading a class online, or individuals using the internet at home to get their work done. Technology will play a key role in helping address the near term challenges the virus has created. We are working hard to continue producing and developing the products that our customers use to address the challenges they face.

But it’s people who are the key to finding the solutions to these new challenges. Putting people first has always been a core value at Lenovo, whether referring to our employees, partners, customers or our communities. With that idea guiding our decisions, I wanted to update you on the steps we’re taking to serve all those people."

Learn more about the innovative technology corporation here,

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Jul 7, 2021

ServiceNow pumps millions into EU service compliance

ServiceNow
Compliance
EU
Schrems II
2 min
ServiceNow
ServiceNow has announced a multimillion euro investment in EU services, providing customers even greater trust, choice, and control over their data

ServiceNow, the digital workflow company, has announced a multimillion euro investment to help EU customers meet compliance requirements.

The legal, technical and organisational safeguards will help companies to comply with the the Schrems II judgment and European Data Protection Board (EDPB) Recommendations issued in June 2021.

ServiceNow’s investment means all EU-hosted data will be exclusively handled within the EU, and the cloud-hosted digital workflow provider claims its solution will come “without impact on current delivery and service”.

ServiceNow upgrade: free of charge

There will be no cost for current customers to opt in to the data compliance solution, even though ServiceNow is investing an unspecified multimillion euro sum and hiring more than 80 new staff across the bloc.

Mark Cockerill, vice president legal, EMEA and global head of privacy at ServiceNow, said: “With any regulation change, cloud services companies have a choice. They can adopt a ‘wait and see’ approach or get proactive and help customers and partners innovate. At ServiceNow we are on the front foot, continually investing in our customers, allowing them to operate with the highest level of choice and control over their EU data.

ServiceNow upgrade: ‘peace of mind’

“Our new EU-centric service delivery model will give our current customers and partners peace of mind. For customers and partners operating in highly regulated industries, or in the public sector, or those that have yet to make the switch to the cloud, this model gives them certainty and simplicity when selecting the cloud service that best suits their needs.”

Carla Arend, lead analyst, cloud in europe for IDC, said, “The Schrems II ruling has led European organizations to revisit their cloud-related data protection policies and processes when it comes to international data transfers through cloud services.

“Contractual, privacy, and security safeguards and the assurance that data will be kept and handled in the EU help European organizations to comply with European data protection laws while taking advantage of global cloud platforms. Vendors, such as ServiceNow, that invest to support their customers in response to this ruling are providing essential choice to their customers.”

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