Capgemini announces development of Project FARM platform

By Georgia Wilson
Capgemini has announced its...

Capgemini has announced its development of an intelligent data platform – Project FARM (financial and agricultural recommendation models).

The platform was designed using artificial intelligence (AI) and Big Data to determine farming patterns generating insights for optimisation of the agricultural value chain in East Africa to strengthen global food supply. In addition to AI, the platform will use machine learning to make it applicable on a wider scale.

With a larger percentage of the world being fed by small famers primarily in developing countries, the complexity of the value chain, the lack of resources and the anticipation of a 60% increase in global food demand by 2050, Capgemini aims to tackle these issues with its Project FARM platform built in collaboration with Agrics.

The data and analytics generated by Project FARM will provide farmers with useful insights for tailor-made optimised crop production, potential business risks and commercial decision making, all of which can be distributed to value chain partners to eliminate inefficiencies.

“By connecting farming communities with data science, and big data with traditional farming methods, the FARM platform is built to optimize the value chain and bring parties together as an ecosystem around one data-driven platform. The platform can pave the way for bringing automated farming to small-scale farmers. With the increasing availability of open data and decreasing prices of sensors and satellite imagery, the future of farming is bright,” commented Julian van Velzen, Data Analyst at Capgemini, leading Project FARM.

SEE ALSO:

Providers of data for Project FARM to run cloud based analytical models include:

  • Agrics, providing crop production data, potential and realised yield, field parameters, credit and repayments.

  • Copernicus, providing weather data via its satellites.

“Project FARM provides Agrics with an excellent opportunity to maximize value for its clients – the smallholder farmers – and to other actors in the value chain like processors and financial service providers. Through our interactions with the farmers we are on top of a huge reservoir of data. We can now turn this data into meaningful insights, which allows us to provide time and location specific products and services to increase yield and lower risk at farm and value chain level. Increased value chain effectiveness will help to directly improve income and food security of rural populations,” added Violanda de Man, Innovation Manager at Agrics East Africa.

 

For more information on all topics for Procurement, Supply Chain & Logistics - please take a look at the latest edition of Supply Chain Digital magazine.

Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Share

Featured Articles

Rich investors drawn to digital assets despite crypto crash

The world’s wealthiest people are sold on the concept of digital assets, as a new survey shows they are being used to construct more resilient portfolios

Five minutes with: Katie Nykanen, Group CTO at QA

Katie Nykanen, CTO at QA, on being a role model for girls and young women and her hopes for the future

Big business bets on real-time data and event-streaming tech

By 2025, 90 per cent of the world’s largest companies will use real-time intelligence to improve customer experience and other areas, new research predicts

Mind your language: Is NLP a natural fit for the Metaverse?

AI & Machine Learning

Cyberattacks make a big difference to manufacturing profits

Cloud & Cybersecurity

ICYMI: Space blockchains and 6G predictions for the future

Digital Transformation