May 17, 2020

Deloitte: 61% of companies are redesigning jobs around AI

AI
Kalyan Kumar
Deloitte
Global Human Capital Trends
Jonathan Dyble
2 min
IT workers
According to Deloitte’s latest Global Human Capital Trends report, 61% of companies are already redesigning their existing jobs to more readily incorp...

According to Deloitte’s latest Global Human Capital Trends report, 61% of companies are already redesigning their existing jobs to more readily incorporate AI and robotics into their operations.

Of those surveyed, four in 10 believe that automation will have a major impact on jobs, whilst 72% of HR and company leaders feel that AI is a topic of significant importance in business.

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However, despite the recognition of the impact that technology will have on jobs, more than 54% of companies currently don’t have a program in place to help their employees build future skills, whilst only 18% actively state that they provide their employees with the opportunity for self-development.

“Jobs will go away,” says Kalyan Kumar, CTO and CVP of HCL Technologies. “However, the onus is on both how companies create opportunities for rescaling people, and also on the individual him or herself.”

“There’s a big difference between the capabilities of human and AI. AI needs lots of data to train itself, whilst humans can do a lot of things with little data. With this in mind, you have to start to identify those augmentation roles and begin to rescale.”

“It’s the responsibility of the individual themselves to adapt, and also the responsibility of the company to create the right avenues for people to be able to do so.”

With jobs roles set to inevitably change over the coming months, companies need to both help employees more with learning the necessary skills, as well as better providing the opportunity for self-development, with less than one fifth of business currently doing so.

Whilst both the report from Deloitte and Kumar himself agree that automation will create new roles and alter existing jobs, a lack of training and education in this field from both the individual and companies will only lead to a further widening of the digital skills gap.

For the full exclusive interview with Kalyan Kumar, see the May edition of Gigabit Magazine.

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Jun 15, 2021

Searching for the Top 100 Leaders in Technology

Technology
AI
live
leaders
2 min
Have your say and nominate technology industry influencers and legends in our search for the Top 100 Leaders announced at upcoming LIVE event

The search is on for the Top 100 Leaders in Technology 2021 – nominated by readers of Technology magazine and open to all.

The initiative has been launched and nominations are now open, with the final, prestigious Top 100 due to be announced during Technology and AI LIVE running 14-16 September, beamed from London to the world.

This latest, definitive list of the leading executives and influencers in the industry will be announced at the event and shared across social media channels, this website, and presented in a special supplement that honours all of those named in our annual list.

The Top 100 Leaders follows on from the well-received Top 100 Women in Technology that BizClik Media Group (BMG) – publishers of Technology magazine, AI magazine and a growing portfolio of industry-leading titles – produced in March this year to coincide with International Women’s Day. 

“The Top 100 Women recognised the incredible and influential women driving our industry,” says Scott Birch, editorial director, BMG. “The success of that initiative encouraged us to recognise the Top 100 Leaders – individuals championing everything that we love about technology and embracing best practice that’s good for business.”

Nominations are already coming in, with some notable highlights including:

Rhonda Vetere - Herbalife

Bryan Smith - Expedient

Nominate your Top 100 Leader HERE

The deadline for nominations closes on Sunday 1 August 2021, and it is free to nominate. The Top 100 Leaders will be announced across our platforms and at the LIVE event.

 

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