May 17, 2020

The answer to your connectivity problems - WiFiBlast

Information Technology
Kayleigh Shooter
3 min
Gigabit Magazine takes a look at WiFiBlast, the tool to solve all of your WiFi and connectivity problems.

Thousands of internet customers are being rip...

Gigabit Magazine takes a look at WiFiBlast, the tool to solve all of your WiFi and connectivity problems. 

Thousands of internet customers are being ripped off by our internet service providers, they deliberately slow down your WiFi on both your desktop computers and mobile devices. Have you ever wondered why it takes five minutes to load up your emails? We explore the WifiBlast range extender and how it can help you out. During this period of nearly everyone working from home, we need to stay connected so it is essential that our internet connection is fast and secure, also. 

What is it?

The innovative technology of WiFIBlast boosts the speed of your wifi and also extends the range, meaning that your wired connection goes further, faster. The device is also the only router in the market that is untouchable by internet service providers. 

The device is compatible with all modern internet service providers.

How does it work?

Internet service providers tend to ‘throttle’ your bandwidth, they do this so you have to pay them more. However, the WifiBlast prevents the throttling by keeping open the maximum bandwidth, so the providers can not tamper with your internet, saving you money. This way, your wifi hotspot is amplified all throughout your house to enable you to have a speedy internet connection all the time. 

Do I need it?

A recent study concluded that 87% of UK residents are unhappy with their internet provider, it seems that all providers throttle their customers, the symptoms of internet throttling are:

  • Slow WiFi speeds in certain rooms

  • Certain devices can’t connect to WiFi (This is a BIG indicator)

  • Connection drops at random times

  • There are dead zones in the house

  • WiFi networks disappear and reappear entirely

  • Slow video streaming (YouTube, Netflix, etc.)

  • Laggy online video gameplay

What do customers say?

Here is one review of the product, the user described it as being easy to set up and effective.

“I felt obliged to write a review since there are some bad reviews of this product. Full disclosure, I've been in IT for 25 years so I generally know my way around technology. I base my 'ease of setup' on if I would be able to walk my mother-in-law through the setup over the phone. This product is brain dead simple to configure and get going.

As for the range-extending capabilities, my access point is on the second floor of our 3 story house (3200 square feet). The extender is on the first floor with the hope of improving wifi to the TV and the family room. I ran a speed test from my laptop. Prior to the WiFiBlast, it got 50mbs/10mbs (down/up). With the WiFiBlast, the laptop got 150mbs/30mbs.

I'll be ordering a second WiFiBlast to put in the master bedroom. The speed isn't needed but the geek in me can't pass up a faster connection for the small cost of this product.”

 

You can purchase the WifiBlast for around $80, which is a bargain when you consider the price of regular routers, which is around $100.

Get your high-speed connection back, here

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Jun 15, 2021

IT Employees Predict 90% Increase in Cloud Security Spending

Technology
Cloud
Cybersecurity
Investments
Elise Leise
3 min
Companies that took the initiative on cloud platforms are trying to cope with the security risks, according to Devo Technology’s report

As companies get back on their feet post-pandemic, they’re going all-in on cloud applications. In a recent report by Devo Technology titled “Beyond Cloud Adoption: How to Embrace the Cloud for Security and Business Benefits”, 81% of the 500 IT and security team members surveyed said that COVID accelerated their cloud timelines. More than half of the top-performing businesses reported gains in visibility. In fact, the cloud now outnumbers on-premise solutions at a 3:1 ratio

But the benefits are accompanied by significant cybersecurity risks, as cloud infrastructure is more complex than legacy systems. Let’s dive in. 

 

Why Are Cloud Platforms Taking Over? 

According to Forrester, the public cloud infrastructure market could grow 28% over the next year, up to US$113.1bn. Companies shifting to remote work and decentralised workplaces find it easy to store and access information, especially as networks start to share more and more supply chain and enterprise information—think risk mitigation platforms and ESG ratings. 

Here’s the catch: when you shift to the cloud, you choose a more complex system, which often requires cloud-native platforms for network security. In other words, you can’t stop halfway. ‘Only cloud-native platforms can keep up with [the cloud’s] speed and complexity” and ultimately increase visibility and control’, said Douglas Murray, CEO at cloud security provider Valtix. 

Here’s a quick list of the top cloud security companies, as ranked by Software Testing Help: 

 

What are the Security Issues? 

Here’s the bad news. According to Accenture, less than 40% of companies have achieved the full value they expected on their cloud investments. All-in greater complexity has forced companies to spend more to hire skilled tech workers, analyse security data, and manage new cybersecurity threats. 

The two main issues are (1) a lack of familiarity with cloud systems and (2) challenges with shifting legacy security systems to new platforms. Out of the 500 IT employees from Devo Technology’s cloud report, for example, 80% said they’d sorted 40% more security data, suffered from a lack of cloud security training, and experienced a 60% increase in cybersecurity threats. 

How Will Companies React? 

They certainly won’t stop investing in cloud platforms. Out of the 500 enterprise-level companies that Devo Technology talked to throughout North America and Western Europe, 90% anticipated a jump in cloud security spending in 2021. They’ll throw money at automating security processes and investing in security upskilling programmes. 

After all, company executives will find it incredibly difficult to stick with legacy systems when some cloud-centred companies have found success. Since moving from Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) offerings to the cloud, Accenture has saved up to 70% on its processes; recently, the company announced that it would invest US$3bn to help its clients ‘realise the cloud’s business value, speed, cost, talent, and innovation benefits’. 


The company stated: ‘Security is often seen as the biggest inhibitor to a cloud-first journey—but in reality, it can be its greatest accelerator’. 

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